What kind of mind is yours?

“Great minds discuss ideas; average minds discuss events; small minds discuss people.” –Eleanor Roosevelt

Ever since I was in college I have been fascinated by people and their backgrounds. How did they get to where they are now? What are their views on different challenges that we face in animal rescue? And for sure, how did they get into animal rescue in the first place?

One of my favorite pastimes is to have discussions with fellow animal rescue professionals focused on saving animals. It’s a little bit of an obsession actually. I enjoy discussing crazy ideas with like-minded people that are open to new ways of solving the problems we all face together in our passion for animals. I have to admit that it is often much harder than I would have imagined to find open-minded people that are willing to change the status quo, to consider new ideas and alternatives and to focus on the commonality of what we are all doing rather than on the differences.

My personal goal is to help reduce the drama and negativity in the animal rescue world today. Whenever I hear an animal rescuer bashing other people in animal rescue I am quick to come to their defense. Whether it is one rescue volunteer bashing another, or the leader of an animal rescue bashing a staff member at a local animal shelter, I am the first to speak up to ask for kindness and understanding regardless of the situation. I try to offer a potential opposing view that brings a calm logic to the discussion and to cause the person doing the bashing to consider an alternative.

We are all working towards a common goal of compassion and care for animals, never euthanizing simply due to overpopulation. Even if we have different approaches to achieving the objectives in animal rescue, we should recognize the importance of brainstorming new ideas, discussing new solutions and programs, and aligning our passions for animals, and less on criticizing or bashing other people who are also working to help animals. Try not to be small minded as Eleanor Roosevelt’s quote alludes, and instead open your mind to the possibility of the moment.

The last mile in animal rescue may be even harder to achieve then the previous ones. And even if you consider that the United States is getting closer to achieving our goal of zero euthanization of healthy animals, the rest of the world can use our support as well to achieve the same.

Supporting new ideas, innovative programs and most of all each other, is the only path to success.

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